Airservices to consult on flightpaths in November

Airservices has announced it will now not publicly release proposed new flight paths until 31 October 2018, despite announcing in early August that its review was 'on track'. It has cited 'significant community feedback' as the reason for the delay, as well as the flight path design being 'technical and complex'.

We are pleased that Airservices's appears to be finally taking flight path redesign in Hobart seriously, we want to be sure that it really is starting from a 'blank piece of paper' and not simply tinkering with the problematic 'RNP1 SID/STAR system' which has already generated significant safety and efficiency issues, as well as imposing unwanted noise on communities.

Southern Cross News Tasmania - Wednesday 5th September 2018

Airservices must genuinely consider all the options for Hobart, including a range of flight paths (including visual navigation) to promote efficiency, ground-based navigation for flexibility, and radar surveillance for, safety - just like any other capital city airport.

Flight path automation abandoned due to safety incidents

Flight path automation abandoned due to safety incidents

As mentioned in an earlier post, implementation of SIDs and STARs in Hobart generated a large spike in safety incidents where arrival and depature paths cross at about 7000ft over the town of Richmond. Aircraft flight management systems were unable to meet the altitudes specified in the design, creating a serious hazard with many breaches and at least three 'loss of separation' incidents.

Residents take legal action over flight path

Residents take legal action over flight path

According to an article in The Australian, residents of Dunalley and Murdunna are taking Airservices Australia to court over the implementation of flight paths. They allege that safety was not Airservices's first priority as it claimed, because the decision was driven solely by the need to move a navigation beacon to accommodate runway works at Hobart Airport and key safety implications were not considered.